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Details of our next meeting can be found here

 

Like minded people interested in a particular subject rarely get the chance to meet up and discuss their interests in a convivial atmosphere. Here at The Local Group we gather once a month at a local hotel in Bexhill, East Sussex where over an evening meal we discuss all aspects of the science behind astronomy.  Active participation is expected and encouraged. Our meetings differ to those of traditional society events with an invited speaker. We maintain a friendly and informal atmosphere and if you would like to attend our meetings please e-mail us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call on 07768 175580.  Some of The Local Group give talks and demonstrations to schools, youth groups, business and  charitable clubs. Details can be found on our website  

M31, The Andromeda Galaxy We take our name from the "Local Group of Galaxies" in which our galaxy, The Milky Way, is one of the larger members.  The Local Group has more than 50 galaxies spread over a distance of 10 million light years.  Prominent members include the Andromeda galaxy (left, click image to enlarge), M31, and its satellites M32 and M110; the Triangulum galaxy, M33 and our own Milky Way.  Our Local Group forms part of the Virgo Supercluster. Use this link to find out more about our local group of galaxies .

 

Images from The Local Group ~ November 2019

 20190903 M20 Trifid Nebula 2m exp 303 in RGB Faulkes South DPlr   

M20 The Triffid NebulaThe Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 and NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means 'divided into three lobes'. The object is a combination of an open cluster of stars, an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent 'gaps' within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are separately catalogued as Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus often observed by amateur astronomers. (Wikipedia). Image: David Pulley with Faulkes 2m South telescope